Our People

Ngā kaimahi – Our People

Tōmaiora Māori Health Research Group is directed by Dr Anneka Anderson. Within Tōmaiora sits a group of leading senior Māori health researchers as well as the Tōmaiora Junior and Emerging researchers. Tōmaiora is supported by the Office of the Tumuaki, Te Kupenga Hauora Māori led by Professor Papaarangi Reid within Mātauranga Hauora, the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences.

Professor Papaarangi Reid (Te Rarawa)

Professor Papaarangi Reid (Te Rarawa)

Tumuaki, Te Kupenga Hauora Māori, Mātauranga Hauora, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences

Professor Reid holds Science and Medical degrees from the University of Auckland and is a specialist in Public Health Medicine. She has tribal affiliations to Te Rarawa in the Far North of Aotearoa and her research interests include analysing disparities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous citizens as a means of monitoring Government commitment to Indigenous rights.

Email: p.reid@auckland.ac.nz

Whaea Julie Wade (Tainui)

Whaea Julie Wade (Tainui)

Community and Cultural Liaison

Whaea Julie Wade (Tainui) is the Community and Cultural Liaison for Te Kupenga Hauora Māori. Whaea Julie assists the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences and kaumātua through this role. She supports Tōmaiora through her knowledge of tikanga, iwi engagement, and in her growing expertise in diverse research projects, including kaumātua health, tuberculosis and rheumatic fever.  

Email: j.wade@auckland.ac.nz

Whaea Dolly Paul (Tainui)

Whaea Dolly Paul (Tainui)

Kaumātua Rūruhi

Whaea Dolly Paul (Tainui) is a kaumātua rūruhi. Whaea Dolly leads core cultural events, oversees tikanga, and supports teaching and research at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland. Whaea Dolly has led the cultural design and integrity of many Māori health research projects centred around her marae and wider community.

Dr Anneka Anderson (Kāi Tahu, Kāti Māmoe)

Dr Anneka Anderson (Kāi Tahu, Kāti Māmoe)

Director, Tōmaiora Research

Dr Anneka Anderson is a Medical Anthropologist currently working as Senior Lecturer at Te Kupenga Hauora Māori, University of Auckland. She is the Director of Hikitia Te Ora – Certificate in Health Sciences (bridging/foundation education for Māori and Pacific), Co-Director of teaching and the Post Graduate Advisor for Te Kupenga Hauora Māori. Anneka is a qualitative kaupapa Māori researcher who focuses her work around Māori experiences of health. Anneka has engaged in research with rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, tuberculosis, antenatal care, health service utilisation and kaumātua health.

Email: a.anderson@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Rhys Jones (Ngāti Kahungunu)

Dr Rhys Jones (Ngāti Kahungunu)

Associate Professor

Rhys (he/him/ia) is a Public Health Physician and Associate Professor in Te Kupenga Hauora Māori (TKHM). As Director of Teaching in TKHM, he has a leadership role in Māori Health teaching, learning and assessment in the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences. Rhys’s research broadly addresses Māori health and health equity. He has a particular interest in the implications of climate change for Māori health and wellbeing, with a focus on climate justice and Indigenous rights. His research also examines the role of health professional education in advancing Indigenous health and equity.

Email: rg.jones@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Sarah-Jane Paine (Tūhoe)

Dr Sarah-Jane Paine (Tūhoe)

Associate Professor

Dr Sarah-Jane Paine is the Research Director of the Growing Up in NZ, the largest contemporary longitudinal study of child well-being and development in Aotearoa. Sarah-Jane was the previous Co-Director of the Tōmaiora Research Group. She holds science degrees from the University of Otago and a PhD in Public Health from Massey University. Her area of research expertise is in the quantitative investigation of ethnic inequities in health and the determinants of health across the life-course.

Email: sj.paine@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Donna Cormack (Kāti Mamoe, Kāi Tahu)

Dr Donna Cormack (Kāti Mamoe, Kāi Tahu)

Associate Professor

Donna has been involved in work on the collection and classification of ethnicity data in Aotearoa/New Zealand, particularly as it relates to measuring and monitoring inequities. Recently, Donna has been focused on work examining the impacts of racism on Māori health and health inequities. Donna coordinated the Kaupapa Māori Theory postgraduate Māori health course at the School of Population Health.

Email: d.cormack@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Elana Curtis (Ngāti Rongomai, Ngāti Pikiao, Te Arawa)

Dr Elana Curtis (Ngāti Rongomai, Ngāti Pikiao, Te Arawa)

Honorary Associate Professor

Associate Professor Elana Taipapaki Curtis  is a Public Health Physician currently working as Senior Lecturer Medical at Te Kupenga Hauora Māori, University of Auckland. She is Director of Vision 20:20 Māori and Pacific support programme for the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences. Dr Curtis recently completed her Doctorate of Medicine (MD) focused on indigenous health workforce development. Continuing Kaupapa Māori reseach includes teaching of indigenous health within medical education, ethnic inequities within emergency department settings, ethnic inequities in cardiovascular care and,  the prevalence of dementia amongst Māori.

Email:  e.curtis@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Jade Tamatea (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Kahungunu)

Dr Jade Tamatea (Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Kahungunu)

Senior Lecturer

Jade  works clinically as an Endocrinologist and Diabetologist at Waikato DHB. Based in Hamilton, she is a senior lecturer with Te Kupenga Hauora Māori, University of Auckland, with research interest in ethnic healthcare inequities, particularly in diabetes and thyroid disease. She is particularly interested in clinical research that addresses the impact the healthcare system plays in inequities. Jade completed a PhD in Medicine in 2019 at the University of Auckland, title “Whakangungu Rākau – Incidence, Severity and Treatment Outcomes of Thyrotoxicosis for Māori.”

Email: j.tamatea@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Karen Wright (Kāi Tahu)

Dr Karen Wright (Kāi Tahu)

Senior Lecturer

Dr Karen Wright is a Public Health Physician currently working as Senior Lecturer at Te Kupenga Hauora Māori. Having worked as a General Practitioner and various other roles within the health system, Karen is passionate about the transformation of our health services and systems to uphold Indigenous rights and achieve equitable outcomes. Research interests include understanding the processes and frameworks to support this transformation. Recent research topics include decolonisation, alcohol related harm, COVID-19, and cerebral palsy.

Email: karen.wright@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Marie Jardine (Ngāpuhi)

Dr Marie Jardine (Ngāpuhi)

Lecturer

Marie (she, her, ia) is a Lecturer and her research is influenced by her experiences of patient journeys as a close whānau member and as a health professional. Her PhD was inspired by her grandparents and clinical practice as a speech-language therapist. Marie shifted her research focus to Māori health and Kaupapa Māori after having her first child during her PhD. Her quantitative and qualitative research interests are broad, including anti-racism, decolonisation of health services and professions, dysphagia (swallowing difficulties), hapū-led initiatives, Māori identity, Indigenous rights to health, maternal health, and mental health. She aspires for tamariki Māori and future Māori generations to thrive collectively as Māori.

Email: m.jardine@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Belinda Loring

Dr Belinda Loring

Senior Research Fellow

Dr Belinda Loring B.Med (MD), MPH (Hons), FAFPHM (RACP) is a non-Māori public health physician, with >15years experience working on health equity and health policy at local, national and international level. She holds a medical degree from the University of Newcastle in Australia, and a Master of Public Health from the University of Auckland.

She previously worked on noncommunicable disease prevention & control, social determinants of health, health equity and national health policies at the World Health Organization (at WHO Headquarters, the WHO Regional Office for Europe, and in Cambodia and Sri Lanka). From 2010-2011 she helped establish AP-HealthGAEN, an Asia-Pacific network for action on health equity and the social determinants of health. In Aotearoa, she has supported Māori health equity work at Te Aka Whai Ora and the Ministry of Health, as well as equity initiatives at DHBs and public health units.

Email: b.loring@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Joanna Hikaka (Ngāruahine)

Dr Joanna Hikaka (Ngāruahine)

Senior Research Fellow

Dr Joanna Hikaka (Ngāruahine) is a Pharmacist and Senior Research Fellow at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Her clinical and research work focuses on older adult and Māori health, spanning primary, secondary, and aged residential care settings, with a current focus on exploring Māori experiences and expectations of kaumātua care in the residential and community settings. Joanna is a Co-director of the newly established Centre for Co-Created Ageing Research at the University of Auckland and holds a number of regional and national governance and advisory roles relating to the responsible use of medicines, gerontology, and aged residential care.

Email: j.hikaka@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Truely Harding (Ngātiwai, Ngāpuhi and Ngāti Porou)

Dr Truely Harding (Ngātiwai, Ngāpuhi and Ngāti Porou)

Research Fellow

Dr Truely Harding is of Ngātiwai, Ngāpuhi and Ngāti Porou descent and is passionate about Māori health. Her research background is in implementation science focusing on highlighting the impact of Indigenous approaches to effectively implementing health programmes with Māori communities.

Email: truely.harding@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Claire Gooder (Pākehā)

Dr Claire Gooder (Pākehā)

Research Fellow

Claire is a Research Fellow within Tōmaiora and is currently working on the project Te Whakahaumaru Taiao: Safe Environments for Māori medical practitioners. As a researcher she has primarily focused on qualitative and discursive approaches to examining marginalisation, discrimination and belonging within mainstream/Western education and health contexts.

Email: c.gooder@auckland.ac.nz

Dr Rachel Mukwezwa-Tapera

Dr Rachel Mukwezwa-Tapera

Research Fellow

Rachel has a background in Public Health and works as a Research Fellow with Tōmaiora. Her research interests are in Indigenous and ethnic migrant health, health equity and the application of Indigenous theories and philosophies in decolonising and indigenist research. Rachel desires to collaborate and contribute to research that interrogates social injustice and makes a positive difference in the inclusion, engagement, participation and representation of marginalised population groups in Aotearoa. Rachel’s current work explores the social effects of neurodiversity on Indigenous African migrants in Aotearoa.

Email: rachel.tapera@auckland.ac.nz